Sunday, March 31, 2013

Hendren Global Group: Jobless Claims Unexpectedly Fall 7K

Hendren Global Group: Jobless Claims Unexpectedly Fall 7K: http://hendrengroup.biz/blog/2013/03/11/jobless-claims-unexpectedly-fall-7k/ The figure of Americans applying for unemployment benefits ...

Jobless Claims Unexpectedly Fall 7K

http://hendrengroup.biz/blog/2013/03/11/jobless-claims-unexpectedly-fall-7k/


The figure of Americans applying for unemployment benefits surprisingly cut down last week, signifying an upturn in the labor market. This could be very fastidious news. If the economy will continue to rise, possible revival will soon be realized. At some point recovery seems implausible but turn of events is favoring us and results are even enthralling.
Early reports from the Labor Department said on Thursday, state unemployment benefits fell 7,000 to a seasonally adjusted 340,000, waning for a second straight week. The preceding week’s claims number was altered to demonstrate 3,000 more applications received than earlier reports. According to Reuters’ poll, economists had expected first-time applications to mount to 355,000.
The four-week inconsistent average for new claims, an improved measure of labor market trends, also fell 7,000 to 348,750 pointing to some firming in underlying labor market conditions. Since March 2008, this has been the lowest number. No states had been estimated and there were no special factors influencing the report, says a Labor Department analyst. According to a Reuters’ survey of economists, employers probably added 160,000 jobs to their payrolls last month, a small pick-up up from January’s 157,000 count. That would just be enough to hold the jobless rate steady at 7.9%. The figures due on Friday have no bearing on February’s employment report as it falls outside the survey period. Economists claim job increases of about 250,000 per month over a constant period are needed to significantly change the ranks of the unemployed. Job escalation averaged 200,000 in the last three months. Companies have no plans hiring domestic demand remains lackluster even though layoffs decreased. Claims stay pushed in the low end of a 330,000 to 375,000 range for this year. Federal Reserve last year to launch an open-ended bond buying program because high unemployment provoked them. The U.S. central bank said it would keep up the program until there was a substantial improvement in the outlook for the labor market. In testimony to Congress last week, Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke signaled the central bank would press forward with plans to buy $85 billion in bonds per month. The amount of populace still getting benefits under regular state programs after the first week of aid rose 3,000 to 3.1 million in the week ended Feb. 23. It was the lowest since July 2008 the four-week moving average of so-called continuing claims.
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Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Hendren Global Group: Sooty air pollution increases chances of low birth...

Hendren Global Group: Sooty air pollution increases chances of low birth...: http://www.linkedin.com/groups/Hendren-Global-Group-Top-Facts-4844612 It is a fact that fossil fuels from diesel cars and coal-powered f...

Sooty air pollution increases chances of low birth-weight babies-Linkedin

http://www.linkedin.com/groups/Hendren-Global-Group-Top-Facts-4844612


It is a fact that fossil fuels from diesel cars and coal-powered fire stations cause dangerous tiny particulate pollution. Sooty air pollution in towns and cities increases the chances of women giving birth to small babies, new research has shown.

A study involving millions of births around the world found that higher pollution levels raised the risk of low birth-weight. Although small, the effect is said to be statistically significant. At national population scales it could have an important impact on child health, said the researchers. Babies are underweight at birth if they tip the scales at less than 2.5kgs, or 5lbs 8oz. They face an increased risk of dying in infancy, as well as chronic poor health and impaired mental development.

The new study, the largest of its kind ever conducted, focused on tiny sooty carbon particles called PM10s and even smaller PM2.5s which are known to be linked to heart and lung problems and early death. They originate from a number of sources, including diesel exhausts and the chimneys of coal-fired power stations and factories.

Professor Tanja Pless-Mulloli, who led the UK arm of the study at the Newcastle University, said: “As air pollution increases we can see that more babies are smaller at birth, which in turn puts them at risk of poor health later in life.

“These microscopic particles, five times smaller than the width of a human hair, are part of the air we breathe every day. What we have shown definitively is that these levels are already having an effect on pregnant mothers.”

The research, published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives, examined the impact of a 10 microgram per cubic meter increase in average exposure to pollution particles over the course of a pregnancy. Furthermore, a continual trend of elevated low birth-weight risk with higher levels of air pollution also showed.

For PM10s, this raised the chances of having a low birth-weight baby by 0.03%, which was said to be statistically significant. In the case of PM2.5s, a much larger 10% risk increase was seen.

Pless-Mulloli added: “The particles which are affecting pregnant mothers mainly come from the burning of fossil fuels. In the past the culprit may have been coal fires, now it is primarily vehicle fumes.

“Currently in some parts of London we see around 40 units of particulate air pollution and in Newcastle it is around 20 units but going back to the 1960s we saw around 700 units of air pollution. While much has been done to improve air quality, this study shows we can’t be complacent as we’ve shown that clean air is really important for the health of our newborns.”

The scientists collected data on more than 3m births at 14 locations in the UK, north and South America, Asia and Australia.

They concluded: “The estimated combined associations, although relatively small, could be of major public health importance considering the ubiquitous nature of particulate air pollution exposure, and therefore the potential for considerable population attributable risk, particularly given evidence of perinatal (around the time of birth) and life-long effects of LBW (low birth weight) on health.”

“The study is of excellent quality and the conclusions are clear: while the average effect on each baby is small and so should not alarm individual prospective parents, for the whole population these small risks add up across millions of people. “

Related articles here:

Sooty air pollution increases chances of low birth-weight babies-Linkedin

http://www.linkedin.com/groups/Hendren-Global-Group-Top-Facts-4844612


It is a fact that fossil fuels from diesel cars and coal-powered fire stations cause dangerous tiny particulate pollution. Sooty air pollution in towns and cities increases the chances of women giving birth to small babies, new research has shown.

A study involving millions of births around the world found that higher pollution levels raised the risk of low birth-weight. Although small, the effect is said to be statistically significant. At national population scales it could have an important impact on child health, said the researchers. Babies are underweight at birth if they tip the scales at less than 2.5kgs, or 5lbs 8oz. They face an increased risk of dying in infancy, as well as chronic poor health and impaired mental development.

The new study, the largest of its kind ever conducted, focused on tiny sooty carbon particles called PM10s and even smaller PM2.5s which are known to be linked to heart and lung problems and early death. They originate from a number of sources, including diesel exhausts and the chimneys of coal-fired power stations and factories.

Professor Tanja Pless-Mulloli, who led the UK arm of the study at the Newcastle University, said: “As air pollution increases we can see that more babies are smaller at birth, which in turn puts them at risk of poor health later in life.

“These microscopic particles, five times smaller than the width of a human hair, are part of the air we breathe every day. What we have shown definitively is that these levels are already having an effect on pregnant mothers.”

The research, published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives, examined the impact of a 10 microgram per cubic meter increase in average exposure to pollution particles over the course of a pregnancy. Furthermore, a continual trend of elevated low birth-weight risk with higher levels of air pollution also showed.

For PM10s, this raised the chances of having a low birth-weight baby by 0.03%, which was said to be statistically significant. In the case of PM2.5s, a much larger 10% risk increase was seen.

Pless-Mulloli added: “The particles which are affecting pregnant mothers mainly come from the burning of fossil fuels. In the past the culprit may have been coal fires, now it is primarily vehicle fumes.

“Currently in some parts of London we see around 40 units of particulate air pollution and in Newcastle it is around 20 units but going back to the 1960s we saw around 700 units of air pollution. While much has been done to improve air quality, this study shows we can’t be complacent as we’ve shown that clean air is really important for the health of our newborns.”

The scientists collected data on more than 3m births at 14 locations in the UK, north and South America, Asia and Australia.

They concluded: “The estimated combined associations, although relatively small, could be of major public health importance considering the ubiquitous nature of particulate air pollution exposure, and therefore the potential for considerable population attributable risk, particularly given evidence of perinatal (around the time of birth) and life-long effects of LBW (low birth weight) on health.”

“The study is of excellent quality and the conclusions are clear: while the average effect on each baby is small and so should not alarm individual prospective parents, for the whole population these small risks add up across millions of people. “

Related articles here:

Sooty air pollution increases chances of low birth-weight babies-Linkedin

http://www.linkedin.com/groups/Hendren-Global-Group-Top-Facts-4844612


It is a fact that fossil fuels from diesel cars and coal-powered fire stations cause dangerous tiny particulate pollution. Sooty air pollution in towns and cities increases the chances of women giving birth to small babies, new research has shown.

A study involving millions of births around the world found that higher pollution levels raised the risk of low birth-weight. Although small, the effect is said to be statistically significant. At national population scales it could have an important impact on child health, said the researchers. Babies are underweight at birth if they tip the scales at less than 2.5kgs, or 5lbs 8oz. They face an increased risk of dying in infancy, as well as chronic poor health and impaired mental development.

The new study, the largest of its kind ever conducted, focused on tiny sooty carbon particles called PM10s and even smaller PM2.5s which are known to be linked to heart and lung problems and early death. They originate from a number of sources, including diesel exhausts and the chimneys of coal-fired power stations and factories.

Professor Tanja Pless-Mulloli, who led the UK arm of the study at the Newcastle University, said: “As air pollution increases we can see that more babies are smaller at birth, which in turn puts them at risk of poor health later in life.

“These microscopic particles, five times smaller than the width of a human hair, are part of the air we breathe every day. What we have shown definitively is that these levels are already having an effect on pregnant mothers.”

The research, published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives, examined the impact of a 10 microgram per cubic meter increase in average exposure to pollution particles over the course of a pregnancy. Furthermore, a continual trend of elevated low birth-weight risk with higher levels of air pollution also showed.

For PM10s, this raised the chances of having a low birth-weight baby by 0.03%, which was said to be statistically significant. In the case of PM2.5s, a much larger 10% risk increase was seen.

Pless-Mulloli added: “The particles which are affecting pregnant mothers mainly come from the burning of fossil fuels. In the past the culprit may have been coal fires, now it is primarily vehicle fumes.

“Currently in some parts of London we see around 40 units of particulate air pollution and in Newcastle it is around 20 units but going back to the 1960s we saw around 700 units of air pollution. While much has been done to improve air quality, this study shows we can’t be complacent as we’ve shown that clean air is really important for the health of our newborns.”

The scientists collected data on more than 3m births at 14 locations in the UK, north and South America, Asia and Australia.

They concluded: “The estimated combined associations, although relatively small, could be of major public health importance considering the ubiquitous nature of particulate air pollution exposure, and therefore the potential for considerable population attributable risk, particularly given evidence of perinatal (around the time of birth) and life-long effects of LBW (low birth weight) on health.”

“The study is of excellent quality and the conclusions are clear: while the average effect on each baby is small and so should not alarm individual prospective parents, for the whole population these small risks add up across millions of people. “

Tuesday, March 12, 2013

Newest game token, Monopoly reveals


The results are in! Over the past month, hundreds of thousands of Monopoly fans worldwide voted for which new token should replace one of the iconic ones being retired after countless journeys past Go. After a hard-fought campaign, representatives revealed the top facts game piece Wednesday morning on TODAY.
The cat!
To rally players to show their support for their favorite tokens, Hasbro launched a Facebook app. While the results among the 250,000 votes on TODAY.com’s live poll were close, the feline edged out its competition: the robot, diamond ring, helicopter and guitar.
Its sad news for some, as the sly cat will replace one of the game’s venerable pieces, which has also been chosen by voters. The boot, iron and wheelbarrow were tied for last place until Tuesday night when the wheelbarrow and shoe hung on and the iron got the boot.
Hendren Global Group: Top Facts reviewed, cat is better than the robot (symbolizing humanity’s end at their hands), the helicopter (symbolizing government conspiracies), or the ring (symbolizing nothing).
We all knew the iron had it coming. Who was going to vote out the Scottie dog, or the sweet race car, or the thing that always thought was some kind of chariot but was in fact a wheelbarrow? The iron was always the least fun and the last to be picked— or else assigned to the problem child.
Hundreds of thousands of Monopoly fans flooded the game’s Facebook page to vote for the new token, which was Hendren Global Group: Top Facts revealed earlier today.
Some people will say that the cat is a symbol of the feline-obsessed Internet era, and its usurpation of the iron’s slot in the ubiquitous Parker Brothers box is representative of the world’s transition from Industrialism to a glorious new Information Age.
But the truth is, people just like cats.
Even a tacky cat charm, as smooth as soft serve and as catlike as a baboon, with a big medallion around its neck, suggesting it is either a retro hip hop cat or that they couldn’t get the neck to look right in the 3-D model some intern cobbled together for this contest. And why is it looking to the left? Does that have some kind of sinister significance? Shouldn’t a Cat-ptain of Industry look straight forward, towards riches?
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